Yet Another Reason to Employ-Contract Me

June 17, 2024
Dear friends,     Yet Another Reason to Employ-Contract Me: the coming wave to Australia of the next stage in the Culture-History Warfare if Trump is elected, in the United States, at the end of year. What the American commentators are saying is, that Americanised change is coming from these types of proposals:     Removing the words […]

Dear friends,

 

 

Yet Another Reason to Employ-Contract Me: the coming wave to Australia of the next stage in the Culture-History Warfare if Trump is elected, in the United States, at the end of year. What the American commentators are saying is, that Americanised change is coming from these types of proposals:

 

 

  • Removing the words “gender” and “abortion” from federal program documents, as well as the related funding.
  • Imposing new restrictions on abortion pills, perhaps through the authority of the Food and Drug Administration.
  • Carving out greater exemptions to anti-discrimination laws intended to protect LGBTQ people.
  • Establishing a more visible role for Christianity in public schools, including more prayer led by both teachers and students.

 

Now, my 1995 thesis was “poop-pooped” back 30 years ago, and the smug political decision-makers back then could not imagine the Australian Christian Lobby (ACL) –backed period of the Coalition Government: John Howard 1996-2007, Tony Abbott 2013-2015, Scott Morrison 2018-2022. The ACL continues this Americanised type of politics.

 

 

There are, in fact, two waves in the next stage in the Culture-History Warfare, but there is only one which offers intelligence. There is also the global wave of compatibility philosophies, inclusive sociologies, and anti-warfare historiographies (of which spiral historiography is one). The last factor is difficult because to be anti-warfare is to be, at some level, battling in the marketplace of ideas. But, unless there is government support here, the game will be won by the intellectually corrupted players.

 

 

Noone can guarantee where the trajectory will end after it is played out in the next few years. That is why I need to be employed or contracted in the universities, dear Vice-Chancellor; if not anyone else, in the Bcc.

 

 

I have a GP appointment this afternoon for references on depression and anxiety. So, stop this bullshitting that my problem is all my mental health. I am, in fact, very responsible for my internalised thinking and mental health. Unfortunately, we have uncaring or idiotic (the same thing in the end; citing references from Hannah Arendt)** political decision-makers who think externalities have nothing to do with a person’s problem. So effectively they, each, are in the art of political dismissal.

 

 

I have attached my recent CV.

 

NDB Full CV June 2024

 

https://wapo.st/4c1aBUh

Kind regards,

Neville Buch

Historian,

Professional Historians Australia (Queensland)

Australian and New Zealand History of Education Society (ANZHES)

Convenor, Sociology of Education Thematic Group, The Australian Sociological Association (TASA).

President, Southern Brisbane Suburban Forum (SBSF).

Director, Brisbane Southside History Network (BSHN).

MPHA (Qld), Ph.D. (History) UQ., Grad. Dip. Arts (Philosophy) Melb., Grad. Dip. (Education) UQ.

 

** “For her, the supreme value of politics is freedom, and freedom in Arendt’s sense depends on plurality, spontaneity, and the open-ended, unpredictable character of interaction through speech and deed.” Frederick Donald (2000). Arendt on philosophy and politics, in Dana Villa (ed.), The Cambridge companion to Hannah Arendt. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 261–276 (2000)p. 271.

Abstract
Hannah Arendt disavowed the title of “philosopher,” and is known above all as a political theorist. But the relationship between philosophy and politics animates her entire oeuvre. We find her addressing the topic in The Human Condition (1958), in Between Past and Future (a collection of essays written in the early 1960s), and in Men in Dark Times (another collection of essays, this one from the late sixties). It is treated in her Lectures on Kant’s Political Philosophy, composed during the seventies, and also in the posthumous Life of the Mind, two of three projected volumes of which were complete when she died in 1975. Certainly, Arendt’s thought cannot be understood without taking into account her deep suspicion of and equally deep commitment to philosophy in the context of political reflection. For all that, her writings on this abiding preoccupation do not gel into a systematically articulated theory or programmatic statement. Instead, they reflect Arendt’s appreciation of what remained for her a “vital tension” – an enigma.

 

Call: 0416 046 429

ABN: 86703686642

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Neville Buch (Pronounced Book) Ph.D. is a certified member of the Professional Historians Association (Queensland). Since 2010 he has operated a sole trade business in history consultancy. He was a Q ANZAC 100 Fellow 2014-2015 at the State Library of Queensland. Dr Buch was the PHA (Qld) e-Bulletin, the monthly state association’s electronic publication, and was a member of its Management Committee. He is the Managing Director of the Brisbane Southside History Network.
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